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Date Title Producer
10/2/00 Great Lake Erie: Art of the Lake Tamar Charney

Description
For years, artists have been drawn to the beauty of the Great Lakes. The number of artist colonies in the region is proof of this. But it isn't just the wild beauty of Lake Superior or the northern parts of Lakes Huron and Michigan that inspire the arts. Even industrial Lake Erie is a source of inspiration as an exhibit on view in Detroit illustrates. "Great Lake Erie: Imagining an Inland Sea" includes contemporary and experimental art work by artists from Buffalo, NY; Cleveland; metro Detroit, and Windsor, Canada. Michigan Radio's Tamar Charney reports.

Interviews
• Michael Lodersted - artist and professor, Kent State University
William Busta - curator, "Great Lake Erie: Imagining an Inland Sea"
Maria Louisa Belmonte - director, Detroit Artist Market

10/5/00 Farewell Symphony: Book About the Composition Gretchen Millich

Description
Parents and teachers now have a new tool for introducing children to classical music. With a new book called "The Farewell Symphony," children can read about why a famous piece of music was written, then listen to the music on a compact disc. Gretchen Millich has the story.

Interviews
• Anna Celenza - professor of musicology, Michigan State University

10/13/00 Church Play: Discussing Homosexuality Matt Shafer Powell

Description
In December of 1995, the school board at Byron Center High School near Grand Rapids tried to fire its music teacher because he was gay. Six months later, the teacher Gerry Crane -- resigned under intense pressure from the school and the community. The following winter, he died of a heart attack at the age of 32. It was a story that received national media attention and opened a hotly contested debate within this traditionally conservative community. Because many of Crane's most outspoken critics came from religious circles, it also polarized many of the region's clergy. Four years later, it's a debate that still simmers. Michigan Radio's Matt Shafer Powell has more on how a group of local ministers is turning to the theatre to keep the discussion going.

Interviews
• Michael Smolinski - playwright
• Sara Campbell - minister, East Congregational Church of Grand Rapids
John Cooper - professor, Calvin Theological Seminary, Grand Rapids

10/13/00 Godot: The Wait for Theater Ends Joan Siefert Rose

Description
Samuel Beckett's play "Waiting for Godot" marked a significant departure for theater when it premiered nearly 50 years ago. Its non-linear script, skeptical point of view and jarring conclusion continue to make it a compelling drama today. This weekend, members of the Gate Theater Dublin perform "Waiting for Godot" and a lesser-known work of Beckett at the University of Michigan. As Michigan Radio's Joan Siefert Rose reports, the performance is the first in a series of theater performances aimed at bring Ann Arbor back to the theater scene.

Interviews
• Michael Kondjiolka - director of programming, University Musical Society

10/16/00 Mail: Daphne and Apollo: A Poem's Musical Setting Tamar Charney/Amy Clark

Description
A new musical work had its world premiere in Ann Arbor. The work pulls together the talents of musicians, singers, a composer and a poet. As Michigan Radio's Tamar Charney reports, composer Enid Sutherland set a poem by Alice Fulton to music.

Interviews
• Alice Fulton - poet
• Enid Sutherland - musician and composer

10/23/00 Arthur Miller: Part 1 - Brooklyn to Broadway Tamar Charney/Chris Felcyn

Description
Arthur Miller's famed theatrical works, from "Death of a Salesman" to "View from a Bridge" to "The Crucible," have explored political events, personal identity and the fraying of America's social consciousness. His work has been credited with reinventing and defining American theater in the 20th century. "Death of a Salesman" was widely praised for its innovative structure and the way Miller wove past, present, and fantasy in a dramatic work; American theater was never again the same. Over the years, Arthur Miller and the University of Michigan have been intertwined. Miller attended the university, receiving two Hopwood awards for his writing. In honor of the "Arthur Miller International Symposium" at U-M, Michigan Radio's Tamar Charney presents a three-part look at Miller.

Interviews
• Enoch Brater - professor of English and theater, University of Michigan
• Christopher Bigsby - professor of American studies and director of the Arthur Miller Center at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England
• Mel Gussow - cultural writer, the New York Times
• Arthur Miller - playwright

10/24/00 Arthur Miller: Part 2 - Attention Must Be Paid Tamar Charney/Chris Felcyn

Description
Arthur Miller was born in New York, but he found his calling as a playwright while he was a student in Ann Arbor. The University of Michigan is hosting the Arthur Miller International Symposium, "Arthur Miller's America: Theater and Culture in a Century of Change." Michigan Radio's Tamar Charney has the second of a three-part look at Miller's life, work and his contribution to American theater. In this part of the series, we look at "Death of a Salesman" and the influence of the McCarthy era on Miller's life and art.

Interviews
• Enoch Brater - professor of English and theater, University of Michigan
• Christopher Bigsby - professor of American studies and director of the Arthur Miller Center at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England
Mel Gussow - cultural writer, the New York Times
• Arthur Miller - playwright
• Studs Terkel - historian and author

10/25/00 Arthur Miller: Part 3 - A Living Legacy Tamar Charney/Chris Felcyn

Description
Michigan is celebrating Arthur Miller. Miller probably best known for penning "Death of a Salesman." But he's also an essayist, a social activist and a graduate of the University of Michigan. He's the recipient of the 2000 Governor's Award for International Achievement in Arts and Culture. In the final part of our three-part series about Arthur Miller, Tamar Charney takes a look at his modern works and his legacy.

Interviews
• Enoch Brater - professor of English and theater, University of Michigan
• Christopher Bigsby - professor of American studies and director of the Arthur Miller Center at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England
• Mel Gussow - cultural writer, the New York Times
• Studs Terkel - historian and author
•  William Bolcom - professor of music and composition, University of Michigan and composer for "View from the Bridge"

10/31/00 Kempf Ghosts Amy Clark/Tamar Charney

Description
People from many cultures have long believed in ghosts. And according to a recent survey, the number of Americans who believe in ghosts has tripled over the past two decades. Here in Michigan, just about every lighthouse, old ship and Victorian building has a ghost story. Even Ann Arbor's Kempf House has its own ghostly lore. Michigan Radio's Tamar Charney has the story.

Interviews
• Carol Mull - Kempf House Board of Directors member
• Wayne Waltripp - former Kempf House Board of Directors member
• Cindy Ferenbacher and Theresa Darling - custodians
• Douglas Hofstadter - professor of cognitive science, Indiana University


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